Biomechanical Cutting

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Ryan
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Biomechanical Cutting

Post by Ryan » Fri Jul 12, 2013 2:15 pm

Has anyone ever heard of this and the associated principles behind it?
Also called the 'sewing machine'.

"But generally, theres not much to tell about what to go after, but cutting various tendons is either easy or hard. the clues about where to cut are everywhere, just hard to see for the untrained mind. lots of suicide attempts are commited with a cut wrist,right? In combat, someone swinging anything at you is putting their wrist towards you, and making it easier to cut. cut the tendons and they cant hold a weapon with that hand, cut all the way to the artery, and they will start gushing out blood, with unconciousness resulting in 20 seconds. just gotta keep em busy till then.

cut the pectocal muscle, not the pectoral major, and suddenly they cant punch or flail like before. cut the tendon just above the knee and they just lost the connection between quadrecep and knee, which results in them being unable to support their weight.

this can be learned if you just take a moment to look at the tendons and muscle groups that move your body, and you pretty much know where to cut or stab. its all based on logic. the hard part is getting to those places without being killed."

It sounds to me like knowing the associated anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) in order to cut with a specific technique and disable or detract the muscle, tendon, ligament(s) capabilities. For instance decreasing range of movement, isolating locations of the body through observed cutting. Sounds like Hollywood theory to me.
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tacticalguy
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by tacticalguy » Sun Jul 14, 2013 2:08 am

I've never heard of it called "biomechanical cutting", I'm aware of the principle behind it, though. It's actually common in the animal kingdom, as an instinct. Ex: Wolves hamstring their prey.
If you have `cleared' all the rooms and met no resistance, you and your entry team have probably kicked in the door of the wrong house.
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civiliansheepdog
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by civiliansheepdog » Sun Jul 14, 2013 9:01 am

Yeah I do it at my Combatives class. It's more of a stopping cut attack so it's not really a "kill" attack. The cuts we do is like a push in and down or push in and up or a push in "J" cuts, like into the inner forearm, triceps, and the quadriceps. It doesn't have to be surgical precision cuts. Then again it might be different for military personnel learning knife combat because for the civilian learning knife combat they have different R.O.E

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Ryan
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by Ryan » Sun Jul 14, 2013 9:40 am

The "kill" sense because I discussing a method in which someone told me they were trained to go for the forearm to disable a primary weapon before going for any target area like the throat.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

civiliansheepdog
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by civiliansheepdog » Sun Jul 14, 2013 9:54 am

Inside the forearm ( palm facing you) yeah that's where all the good stuff is, radial nerves good bye hand functions. But whatever is present you should go for the attack.

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Ryan
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by Ryan » Sun Jul 14, 2013 11:44 am

That's what I said... go for the kill. You can control the arm in other ways. And his diagrams were a cut starting from around the elbow area... full of dermatones... flinch response for sure.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

nathanwagar
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by nathanwagar » Sat Feb 08, 2014 9:13 am

Biomechanical cutting is updated terminology for a very old idea: "defanging the snake" in Filipino systems. It is simply applied to opponent mobility based on tendon/ligament damage as opposed to specifically disarming the weapon. It's the same concept, just broadened.

Problem: The concept was medically unsound then, and it still is now. It "can" work, but it isn't based on any empirical evidence whatsoever, and ignores the relevant medical literature beyond a superficial reference. The people that are the biggest proponents of this concept are ironically the same people that never seem to have an understanding of basic control in the clinch. Having control of the clinch is the only possible way to restrict his movement enough to work "biomechanical cutting" with any worthwhile percentage of success, and if you're there, you could be killing him. Ryan is on point when he says the focus should be on kill shots. Anything else is merely a target of opportunity.

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tacticalguy
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Re: Biomechanical Cutting

Post by tacticalguy » Sun Feb 09, 2014 5:25 am

I've actually seen a kenjutsu demonstration of this biomechanical cutting. The instructor, a very spry, elderly Japanese man, and his demonstrators used wooden bokkens that had been coated with a marking substance. He used it against first one, then two, three and finally, four attackers at once. Everyone involved wore gis that had been treated with a reactive substance, also. At the end of each engagement, he would walk around so that we could all see that he had not a mark on him. His attackers however, were a different story, entirely. Their gis were completely white at the beginning and by the end, they looked like zebras but, only in specific areas, at the joints. His end of class dissertation never mentioned biomechanical cutting. He stated that it was a method of taking your opponent apart that had been much favored by Miyamoto Musashi, in his duels.
If you have `cleared' all the rooms and met no resistance, you and your entry team have probably kicked in the door of the wrong house.
(Murphy's Cop Laws)

The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan. (Von Clausewitz)

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