ESA/TD

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ESA/TD

Postby Ryan » Fri Jun 27, 2014 11:35 pm

How does External Structure Analysis or Tactical Diagramming fit into the planning component of an operation? If it is a direct action mission, how does it differentiate and can it be effectively utilized?
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Re: ESA/TD

Postby Breacher01 » Tue Nov 01, 2016 5:48 pm

If we know a situation days before an eventual insertion we plan accordingly. this involves all executive decisions until engagement. when engaging a suspect it nice to know his history, but that doesn't really effect decisions made.

If we're engaging direct action we usually have between 2 hours and 30 minutes of surveillance. Thank of entry ways, suspects brief history, known history of suspect(s) on file and information from family or other relations.

I can't really go into detail about what details we gather, but its a lot, even within half an hour.

Only when we get information of a terrorist threat happening right away we go out with intel gathering before. but we have a lot of detailed information on likely terrorist targets. There is always some type of intel, but we take an anonymous threat phone call as intel if we have nothing more detailed.

Within 20/30 minutes we gather data on entry points, individuals likely at the scene, the threat(i.e. explosive, fire arms etc) from various sources, so we know the brand of locks etc. often before we exit the fast cars. We drive armored Audi/BMW/Mercedes in private and on the job, so we travel at an average of 160-180kmh when called.

To much info, I know. But there's been a short television series in early 2016, so a lot is unclassified.
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Re: ESA/TD

Postby Sin » Wed Mar 29, 2017 6:17 pm

Keeping it at the team level and especially for a coordinated entry: we use the acronym "CLPMRT". In correct order 1. Comm plan 2. Phase lines (Boundary and Safety) 3. Link up plan 4. Target identification 5. Rehearsals and 6. Mission success.

1. Self explanatory, have your primary, secondary, and terceriary means of communicating.

2.During a coordinated entry, teams will be entering the objective from different locations. Phase lines are made to prevent blue on blue. Your boundary phase line is a small general area inside the objective where your team can possibly come into contact with another friendly team. Your safety phase line is a "DO NOT CROSS!" area inside the objective without following the link up plan.

3. Your link up plan is how teams can assemble in the objective at the boundary or safety phase lines. Different units have different SOPs. We use the knock method most of the time. Team A knocks 3 times, team B knocks 2 times, team A knocks 1 time.

4. General enemy SITREPs or if there's a specific target(s). Name, age, rank, etc.

5. Everything from PCCs and PCIs to building tape houses.

6. Objective complete. Have an evac plan. Depending on the time spent on the objective, keep in mind setting up hard points, connecting files, and consolidation areas: dirty pit, clean pit, threat pit, and med pit.
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Re: ESA/TD

Postby tacticalguy » Thu Mar 30, 2017 7:58 pm

Sin wrote:Keeping it at the team level and especially for a coordinated entry: we use the acronym "CLPMRT". In correct order 1. Comm plan 2. Phase lines (Boundary and Safety) 3. Link up plan 4. Target identification 5. Rehearsals and 6. Mission success.

1. Self explanatory, have your primary, secondary, and terceriary means of communicating.

2.During a coordinated entry, teams will be entering the objective from different locations. Phase lines are made to prevent blue on blue. Your boundary phase line is a small general area inside the objective where your team can possibly come into contact with another friendly team. Your safety phase line is a "DO NOT CROSS!" area inside the objective without following the link up plan.

3. Your link up plan is how teams can assemble in the objective at the boundary or safety phase lines. Different units have different SOPs. We use the knock method most of the time. Team A knocks 3 times, team B knocks 2 times, team A knocks 1 time.

4. General enemy SITREPs or if there's a specific target(s). Name, age, rank, etc.

5. Everything from PCCs and PCIs to building tape houses.

6. Objective complete. Have an evac plan. Depending on the time spent on the objective, keep in mind setting up hard points, connecting files, and consolidation areas: dirty pit, clean pit, threat pit, and med pit.


Excellent summation.
If you have `cleared' all the rooms and met no resistance, you and your entry team have probably kicked in the door of the wrong house.
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The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan. (Von Clausewitz)
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Re: ESA/TD

Postby Breacher01 » Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:21 pm

Not to attack anyone, but I fail to recognize all your point-precise descriptions of going into a room with an unknown threat.

It worries me to see you all talk about entering areas where the threat is unknown. The cause may be all mine because I do this daily, but I think in theory its all valuable, but in in practice it may not be in your best interest.

As I mentioned before this is daily business for me, and different methods are used among each other, considering the situation and environment we operate in. I still have a hard time with most English 3 letter acronyms for tactical situation or decisions, but overall i think its like a sense which needs to be trained, and not a practice to be conducted by technical terms.

When conducting my job on European soil we never use your jargon, and we have very different names and words for the same things, although we hardly ever use them in the field, even between teams with different mother-languages.

Movement within a confined(cqb) area is and should be natural/native(combine the words) for professionals.
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