EDIP

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Ryan
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EDIP

Post by Ryan » Mon Mar 03, 2014 10:54 am

"It's one reason, however, that British Infantry function so well at the basic level. Everything is instinctive, and taught through repetition. The Yanks have a habit of overthinking infantry soldiering, which is in essence very simple. Be fitter than your enemy, be stronger than your enemy, shoot better than your enemy. Stay low, move fast with maximum violence and aggression. It's worked for the British Army for the last few hundred years, hasn't it?

EDIP is the principal of "education" in the British Army. Explanation, Demonstration, Imitation and Practice. That's how every rolls along. Everything is written in the Soldier's notebook, of course, in terms of mnemonics and acronyms etc. But it's all designed for idiots to understand. That's a strength, in my mind, when it comes to soldiering, especially when training Africans."

A conversation with a mate. Explanation, Demonstration, Imitation and Practice.

Thoughts?
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

ClearRight
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Re: EDIP

Post by ClearRight » Sat Mar 08, 2014 9:44 pm

Never heard the term before, but that basically sums up how I teach practical skills.

Explain the whys and hows. At least for me, knowing the whys behind something is motivating and helps me better understand the connections between the different things we do as soldiers.
Demonstrate - in whole, then part by part (walk through, talk through).
Imitate - part by part, then whole (walk through, talk through).
Practice - under supervision by instructors to make sure you train right. A faulty repetition is a wasted repetition!

I'd also like to add one last point: ingrain (where appropriate). You practice something so much it becomes second nature. Something as simple as a correct trigger press needs to be practiced to the point where you don't have to spend any mental energy - the brain decides to take the shot, then the good trigger press comes automatically. That way, you can focus on what's important: your target and the situation around you.
More guns and bullets make bad guys go away faster,
which in turn makes everyone in the area safer.
- Paul Howe

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tacticalguy
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Re: EDIP

Post by tacticalguy » Tue Mar 11, 2014 3:28 am

I agree with CR. He hit the nail on the head when it comes to training any troops, really.
If you have `cleared' all the rooms and met no resistance, you and your entry team have probably kicked in the door of the wrong house.
(Murphy's Cop Laws)

The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan. (Von Clausewitz)

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Ryan
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Re: EDIP

Post by Ryan » Tue Mar 18, 2014 12:24 am

I like ingrain. Adding that to the toolbox.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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