A Good Breach

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Ryan
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A Good Breach

Post by Ryan » Wed Jul 15, 2015 5:27 pm

http://www.raf.mod.uk/news/archive/a-go ... h-29112013

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"Members of RAF Waddington based No 2503 (County of Lincoln Squadron)RAuxAF Regiment have recently continued their Close Quarter Battle (CQB) training at RAF Honington’s Advanced Urban Combat Training Facility.

Sgt Martin Berry demonstrating CQB techniques

CQB is the employment of specific tactics and skills in order to efficiently take, dominate and clear an urban environment which, in the RAF Regiment’s role, could include key airfield facilities and buildings, such as hangars and Air Traffic Control Towers that need to be preserved intact, so they can be brought back into use as rapidly as possible.

The Gunners began their CQB training earlier in the year by honing their rifle and pistol skills at short ranges; this progressed onto a four-day CQB tactics and drills package as part of the Squadron's Annual Continuous Training (the Reservists’ two-week Annual Camp) at Catterick Garrison in September. This most recent training further developed the skills already learnt and pushed theCQB training with 2503 Sqn Reservists to truly embrace the Initiative Based Tactics approach to CQB, where every man has the responsibility to make decisions on his and the team’s actions as the scenario they encounter unfolds.

Under the direction of the squadron’s CQB Instructors, Sgt Martin Berry and Cpl Tom Boyhan, the training took Squadron personnel through new and challenging drills. Firing from the ground, where the individual fights his way back to standing to continue the drill, breaching doors using force to break into buildings and rooms, the tactical use of bullet-proof ballistic shields to enable the team to push forward to dominate more dangerous areas and most importantly, the fluidity with which the team or “Stack” makes progress through a complex. It is this fluid progress of the Stack that is key to the CQB tactics success, with the enemy being taken by surprise and any threat eliminated in an almost surgical fashion.

Cpl Boyhan, who is normally employed as a commercial diver on civilian engineering jobs said:

“The Squadron's CQB training will reach its climax in early 2014 with two days of further continuation and confirmation training. Like this weekend, instead of firing at paper targets, the guys will be engaging an armed enemy force with “Simunition”; this paint-filled ammunition is used in standard issue weapon systems and will leave a coloured mark when firing is accurate.”

Between drills, SAC Nick Sykes, who is a subscription campaign planner within the publishing industry in his civilian life, said:

"CQB training is very different to our usual open warfare doctrine; it continually tests and challenges each of us physically and mentally in a fast paced and ever-changing environment".

Editor: Janet O'Neill

Photographs: Sgt Bibby

Sgt Martin Berry demonstrating CQB techniques.

Corporal Boyhan adjusting the laser sights on a rifle with Senior Aircraftman Nick Sykes (R).

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RAF/MOD Crown Copyright 2013"

Does anyone agree with the highlighted statement? Stack = success?
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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DareTactical
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Re: A Good Breach

Post by DareTactical » Fri Jul 17, 2015 7:45 am

I understand what he was trying to say but i think to assume that success is inherent from a good stack is wrong, and to state it in this way is a huge oversimplification.

A good stack can lay a foundation for a good room entry (tight stack = good coordination/communication, minimal delay between each team member going through threshold), but I would personally put more emphasis and give more merit on execution of the room entry itself.
"train hard, fight easy"

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Ryan
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Re: A Good Breach

Post by Ryan » Sun Jul 19, 2015 7:36 am

DareTactical wrote:I understand what he was trying to say but i think to assume that success is inherent from a good stack is wrong, and to state it in this way is a huge oversimplification.

A good stack can lay a foundation for a good room entry (tight stack = good coordination/communication, minimal delay between each team member going through threshold), but I would personally put more emphasis and give more merit on execution of the room entry itself.
Exactly. From the enemy's point of view does it really matter if you're stacked or stackless? No. All they see is two guys coming in initially. The differences might be gap of dispersion, angles of attack on entry and therefore the speed and style of execution but if you do them right, they should be pretty similar. Stackless you're not confined to virtually one angle of movement into the room (i.e. from one side of the door, running along the walls on a same-side stack), you can come offset and attack different parts of the room, sometimes before threshold, and then meet the corners. Stacking is, at least in range safety purposes, safer but it does not translate to success.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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