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FWB at the POI

Posted: Thu Jun 12, 2014 9:08 pm
by Ryan
Fresh Whole Blood transfusions at the Point of Injury. Yes, field transfusions (and buddy transfusions - two separate things) have been conducted for a long time. Sometimes on the ground, sometimes in transport and more likely at an MTF. But the growing trend is, in critically ill patients, to transfuse at the site of injury.

http://www.havokjournal.com/fitness/vif ... 569xz3hizq

Re: FWB at the POI

Posted: Wed Jun 25, 2014 11:44 pm
by tacticalguy
That has everything to with reducing the effect of shock and/or hypovolemia to the body. Blood loss is obvious but, many don't realize that shock kills and quickly.

Re: FWB at the POI

Posted: Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:15 am
by Ryan
And that blood transfusions can do the same. O- blood is a great universal donor but the potentials you must still be aware of. I remember a case on a TV show following pre-hospital physicians in London. One blood transfusion precipitated retardation in clotting factors and the clotting cascade, as well as filling the atria with preformed blood clots, causing those clots to disperse -- all in all PE time and increased potential for strokes.

Re: FWB at the POI

Posted: Tue Jul 01, 2014 4:41 am
by tacticalguy
Ryan wrote:And that blood transfusions can do the same. O- blood is a great universal donor but the potentials you must still be aware of. I remember a case on a TV show following pre-hospital physicians in London. One blood transfusion precipitated retardation in clotting factors and the clotting cascade, as well as filling the atria with preformed blood clots, causing those clots to disperse -- all in all PE time and increased potential for strokes.
Quite true. You have to be aware of all of the risks inherent in any treatment. I'm reminded of the very first CPR class that I took when I first entered the Army in '86. The instructor said that if you didn't hear ribs cracking, that you weren't doing good CPR. Someone asked if that couldn't create a further issue...? The instructor stated the first priority was the patient being in cardiac arrest, everything else was academic until the patient revived. So, would I withhold potentially lifesaving treatment to minimize the risk of having to deal with another disaster in 5-10 minutes? Nope. I'll deal with the issues as they arrive.