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Ryan
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H2H Articles

Post by Ryan » Sat Jun 09, 2012 1:36 am

CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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tacticalguy
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Re: H2H Articles

Post by tacticalguy » Sun Jun 10, 2012 5:28 am

That was one damned impressive Ghurka! They are storied warriors, anyway and he's just added more honor and glory to the Ghurka mythos.
If you have `cleared' all the rooms and met no resistance, you and your entry team have probably kicked in the door of the wrong house.
(Murphy's Cop Laws)

The greatest enemy of a good plan is the dream of a perfect plan. (Von Clausewitz)

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Ryan
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Re: H2H Articles

Post by Ryan » Wed Apr 03, 2013 11:59 pm

CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2809
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: H2H Articles

Post by Ryan » Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:42 pm

"BLACKBELT PSYCHOLOGY
Never Hesistate In Combat Again
by Marcus Avellan
Heavyweight boxing world champion "Iron" Mike Tyson once said,
"Everybody has a game plan until they get punched in the mouth..."
Is this statement true? Yes... but why?

Because when one takes a powerful shot to the chin, the mental
state it sends you straight into is unfamiliar territory for most.
Furthermore, most people spend all their time planning for ideal
scenarios.

When one is preparing for combat, whether it be in the cage, ring,
or on the street, one needs to be preparing the body and mind for
the unexpected. In one of my fights, I was fighting a southpaw and
got hit with a little flicking right hook - but it got me right
behind the ear. With only MMA gloves and getting hit behind the ear,
this shot rocked me. I remember first I was facing my opponent, and
the very next moment, instantly, I was now facing the wrong way,
looking over completely to my right.

My reaction? I went and took him down. I remember it didn't phase
me. However, many fighters have tucked their tail in between their
legs the second they get rocked by a hard shot... so did I react
better because I was braver?

Maybe I was braver, I don't know, but I don't think that was the
reason... anyone that steps into the cage or ring is a brave person
to begin with.

What really made the difference was my preparation. I've been
drilling for that exact moment my entire martial arts career. How
so?

I want to share a few of the drills that I practice and teach my
students.

The first drill is the "dizzy" drill, where I put a glove or mitt
on the ground, bend over at the waist, point at the glove, and spin
around it as fast as I can for 30 seconds... then they change
directions and spin the other way for 30 seconds (totally one
minute), and then when the minute is up, a whistle is blown and an
opponent attacks! If you are doing this right, you should be
totally "drunk", stumbling around, hardly being able to stand,
with the fresh opponent is coming in to do a finishing style
barrage. If you happen to fall, the opponent would get on top.
The drill is for the "hurt" person to relax, get used to the dizzy
feeling, stay confident, and fight off the attacker until they gain
their wits again. For beginners, I do the same drill but only with
shadow boxing, so they got to flurry on their feet until they
regain full composure, which usually takes about a minute
(depending on how hard and fast they actually spun). When doing
this drill for your students, you have to coach your students to push
as hard as they can with the spinning and to remain bent over while
pointing at a single dot or object.

Another drill I like to do is have someone close their eyes and then
have their sparring partner randomly place themselves somewhere
around them... and when I blow the whistle, they open their eyes and
react to the oncoming attacker (this is the drill that helped me with
my fight). This way they get used to reacting quickly when the
"lights go out". For MMA, I like to do this on the ground as well,
where somebody will start lying on their back or face first (simulating
a flash knock down) and their opponent will start at a random position,
either away from them at different angles or already standing over
them, and when the whistle blows, you go live.

Speaking of lights out... another drill I like to play with is
actually turning off the lights in the room! While shadowboxing,
I'll turn out the lights, and as soon as I turn them back on, everyone
has to throw combo full blast... this is to teach the reaction that
when the lights go out and come back on, that your reaction is to
fire away and not hesitate.

Final drill I'll share on this email... I like to have my guys on
the mitts or bags throwing a pacing style never ending one, two,
one, two combo... and then I'll randomly come around and strike
them in the face with a boxing glove, and the second they get hit,
they have to retaliate on the mitts or bags with a full blown
vicious combo (depending on the combo I want worked on). For
instance, I'll say "when I hit you react with 2, 3, 2..." so
everybody is going with a pacing, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2... and then I
smack them and they fire back 2, 3, 2, and then resume back to
1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2... this is to teach them that if they are throwing a
combo and get hit, to push forward and retaliate with another
combo and not to take a back step or hesitate.

I came up with these drills, except the dizzy drill, that is super
common. I simply thought to myself, "How can I re-create the
situation of getting hit..." and developed all of these
scenarios... and THAT is my biggest goal with this email. My goal
is to help illustrate the importance of properly preparing for
combat by being ready for the Mike Tyson "getting punched in the
mouth" part of developing a game plan. I'm sure you can come up
with all sorts of cool drills to simulate getting hit or rocked... so
get to it! :) I got a few more, I'll share them soon.
Sincerely,
Marcos Avellan
1-888-FFA-GYMS

P.S. If you come up with some cool drills - please share! Email
me and let me know, I'm always looking for new stuff."
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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