Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

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DareTactical
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Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

Post by DareTactical » Mon Sep 14, 2015 10:22 am

In the video below (watch from 1:10 onward) the instructor explains that when approaching a corner, one needs to hold the pistol in the hand opposite to the corner. If you are right handed and approaching a right corner, this means switching the pistol from right to left hand, and vice versa. This is the pistol equivalent of rifle shoulder transitions (switching the shoulder against which the butt stock rests), and aims to limit exposure when cornering.

Is there a need to switch hands when using pistols?

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Re: Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

Post by Ryan » Mon Sep 14, 2015 10:32 am

You have to remember that he is using a supported position with his other hand. This is not traditional "one-handed" shooting with pistol. It makes sense if you're going as slow as he is, clearing from outside the room. That said, there wasn't a GREAT deal of difference - less shoulder/upper arm exposure. But the way he held the flashlight he "lead" with that hand, I wouldn't advise that against a prepared threat. Try it Force-on-Force. Your hand will be stinging and numb for a day or two. Or the shooter might wait and door ambush your face instead.
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Re: Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

Post by tacticalguy » Tue Sep 15, 2015 12:35 am

Well, I have a tendency to angle my head and body at almost 90 degrees while keeping my hips somewhat straight in a sideways crouch and using both hands on the weapon. Just me.
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Re: Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

Post by DareTactical » Tue Sep 15, 2015 5:28 am

When holding the pistol in a modern grip hold, using an isoceles firing stance/position, I personally wouldn't waste my time switching hands as it takes me out of the fight, even for a short time.

I think off-setting the pistol to align it to the right or left shoulder depending on the upcoming corner, while maintaining the primary grip, is sufficient. Your arm lengths will be fairly even when firing a pistol two handed, versus firing a rifle.

Gabe Suarez also has another solution to cornering an opposite-side / offside corner while maintaining primary grip.
He rolls the pistol 90 degrees so that the side-face of the pistol is parallel to the floor and the pistol sights are aligned to his weakside upper arm/shoulder. He clearly states that he cannot see the sights, but that since the distances are so close, there is no real need to. He can simply look down the pistol slide in order to aim the weapon.
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Re: Cornering with Pistols - Switching the grip hand

Post by Eiffel » Fri Oct 23, 2015 4:08 am

I think that's Ken Good (formerly of Surefire's low light combat school, later with Strategos). You have to remember that his technique is meant also for low light fighting, and began with handheld lights, not dedicated weaponslights mounted directly at 6 o'clock. So with a conventional Harries grip, you could corner one side very well, but the opposite side corner would cause you to expose yourself 2-3" more to clear the light from the wall and properly ID the threat without flashing yourself. Also other flashlight techniques such as modified FBI will force you into an awkward shooting position or cause you to illuminate yourself more when used on the opposite corner. Ken's curriculum also involved a ton of low light force on force so I do think he emphasizes use of cover more than most of his contemporaries in CQB instruction.

You can clearly see his low-light influence in that simultaneous entry. I don't think many SWAT teams would want to do that in full light simply because in staging for it you kind of linger in the threshold, and unless it's dark, someone will definitely start shooting while you're in this awkward stance.

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