Timing

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Ryan
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Timing

Post by Ryan » Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:07 am

What should your average time be to clear a room? I've heard for a 2 man team in a small corner-fed it should be under 4 seconds.
Do instructors time you? If so what are punishments for slowness, unsmooth characteristics and such.

Your timing and splits are very important, I think a lot of people underestimate it yet keep talking about the principles of speed. Pfft!

In racing you go by your split time, "The split time is the time taken to complete an initial distance in a longer event. So let's say you are having a 200 lap race. A split time could be taken at say every lap." You work out your micro-mistakes and you gradually bump your split down, even if it's by 0.083 seconds! Do this while adding in those combat factors of increasing accuracy and perfect your drill and you're set.

In racing they even have a "racing line" which is the line you follow at a certain speed and angle to get the best out of your car and if you follow it specifically you can gradually overtake others until you're ahead. Once you're ahead and keep following it you can gain six plus seconds or more lead time. There isn't such a thing in CQB but there could be with some pre-thought.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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jimothy_183
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Re: Timing

Post by jimothy_183 » Fri Jan 11, 2013 10:32 am

Whoa! Hold yer horses there! I'll ask again, how long is a piece of string? :wink:

But to answer, you take as long as you need to clear it properly and as quickly as possible to maintain the momentum. If you have lost the momentum and the BGs have prepped defences then you might have to slow the fuck down or stop and reorg if necessary and see what your best options are. You might have to switch to using safer tactics like limited pen or you might even consider withdrawing to flush them out with other means such as gas etc etc.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

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Ryan
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Re: Timing

Post by Ryan » Fri Jan 11, 2013 2:41 pm

Well of course that begs the question: "How fast can you go?" and "How fast can you go before failing and/or making a mistake?". I'm sure teams all about speed find their safe limits and are comfortable in those limits. On the other hand you're right, once you lose it you have to regain it or scoot. Regaining it isn't necessarily about speed or the principles at that point but a controlled approach to the said situation. But again if you are at the fastest you can be for that drill that begs the question of "does this increase my survivability?" it is common of course to answer yes. Speed can win firefights.

Once you knock down timings, you leave yourself in a safer position; especially if you operate mainly around dynamic entries. If I can buttonhook a second quicker than you, that's a second more I have to clear my threat area. The same goes with the Czech SOG member in an earlier posted video who leans whilst coming in on a modified (straight) entry and clears his hard corner just as he hits the doorjamb. Fast! And it saves him time, he's pulling into the center before he even hits the corner. That saved what - 0.5 seconds. It adds up. You'd think a 2 second lead in a race wouldn't be a lot, but it can add up to literally you turn into this corner as I turn out of the next one.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

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Re: Timing

Post by Dramaticus » Tue Jan 15, 2013 6:52 pm

The 15 Second "SUSPECT AWARENESS" Rule: It takes a suspect about 15 seconds to prepare himself for defence or escape! State of shock lasts from 1-3 seconds, state of confusion lasts another 12 seconds. With the 12 secs meaning the the timeline it takes a suspect to shift from a confused state to a state where he/she gets a picture of what is happening around the house. He/she now understands for example that there are people entring the kitchen window and that they are armed, and that he/she can now either escape out the cellar window or find his/her shotgun and ambush the entry team at the stairs to the attic.
The 30 Second "PUSH or HOLD" Rule: The longer you work outside, the less chance you have of success using dynamic entry tactics. Serious consideration should be given to aborting the entry if the breaching effort continues beyond thirty seconds. The element of surprise has been totally lost in such cases and setting up a perimeter and initiating a “surround and call out” is reasonable and prudent. Or transition to Slow and Deliberate Clear Techniques.
It does also exist a so-called "30 second rule" for hostage rescues and crisis entries. Source of information regarding hostage rescue rule: Hostage Rescue Tactics, Anatomy of Hostage Rescues
Formerly known as, Dramatikk.

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