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The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 3:30 am
by Ryan
What are some of the "Golden Rules" to stick by in CQB? Any there any 'laws'?

When it comes to rules I find it hard to stick by all of them as they are so rigid and just remind me of pure SOP's as some are not rules but statements, i.e. if you break the rule you're not always punished for it.

Golden Rules:
Do not stop in the doorway
Do not point your rifle at someone's back at any time - if so you're not only endangering them but you're also not doing your job of providing security

Others?

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sat Jul 14, 2012 6:58 pm
by Dramatikk
- Never move faster than you can accurately shoot.

- Always keep an elbows lenght from the wall to avoid getting hit by ricohcets. (Bullets bounce off walls)

- The One Meter Rule: Never point your muzzle any closer than ONE meter from your teammates!

... Any more "Golden Rules", people?

Kind regards, Dramatikk. :)

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sun Jul 29, 2012 2:41 pm
by Dramatikk
- Cover Your Buddy.

- Keep In Mind The 15 Second "SUSPECT AWARENESS" Rule: It takes a suspect about 15 seconds to prepare himself for defence or escape! State of shock lasts from 1-3 seconds, state of confusion lasts another 12 seconds. With the 12 secs meaning the the timeline it takes a suspect to shift from a confused state to a state where he/she gets a picture of what is happening around the house. He/she now understands for example that there are people entring the kitchen window and that they are armed, and that he/she can now either escape out the cellar window or find his/her shotgun and ambush the entry team at the stairs to the attic wich is dark.

- Never Enter a Room Alone!

- Communicate, Communicate, Communicate!

Kind regards, Dramatikk. :)

Source of Information Conserning The 15 Second Rule

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sat Aug 04, 2012 5:56 pm
by Dramatikk
- Avoid Flagging Your Gun Barrel When Clearing A Corner (Using For Example The "Slicing The Pie" Technique), & Prior To A Room Entry If Your Are The Point Man (Thinking About The Stack Up Procedure).

- Keep In Mind The 30 Second "PUSH or HOLD" Rule: The longer you work outside, the less chance you have of success using dynamic entry tactics. Serious consideration should be given to aborting the entry if the breaching effort continues beyond thirty seconds. The element of surprise has been totally lost in such cases and setting up a perimeter and initiating a “surround and call out” is reasonable and prudent. Or transition to Slow and Deliberate Clear Techniques.

Kind regards, Dramatikk. :)

Source of Information Conserning The 30 Second Rule

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Tue Aug 07, 2012 3:56 pm
by tacticalguy
Look up! In the dark, we tend to look at the end of the flashlight arc which is either at low or high ready. Remember, the subject/suspect/BG/tango/ENEMY may also be up at some elevation, watching you.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 1:38 pm
by Ryan
Someone recently stated to me that one of his Golden Rules of CQB/Warfare (even field operations) was... "To not shoot from behind someone", "Do not fire from behind someone" -- due to some kind of FF risk which I could see with those unskilled but one step further it's apparently all about safety, no matter how skilled you are with a weapon, even under danger it shouldn't happen. He is conventional military, Canadian. Thoughts?

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Thu Sep 06, 2012 8:48 pm
by jimothy_183
http://www.combatshootingandtactics.com/published/cqb_july_%2006_final.pdf wrote:
SAFETY

One of the core safety rules that I teach in any tactical course is that the lead shooter has the priority of shot. This means you do not shoot past other officers. You either get on line or move ahead of them to make a shot. Four out of five times you will get away with shooting past your partners, but the fifth time you will shoot one of your own. In the past two years, there have been at least two instances in which officers were struck by friendly fire during shootouts with bad guys. In both cases, officers in the rear of the formation shot officers in front of them.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 12:06 am
by Ryan
Good statement but officers vs infantry. Totally different roles, theaters. Conventional vs unconventional, totally different - Section tactics to Platoon. For a conventional guy I can see and understand those rules and fears but for the unconventional guys I've talked to they agree with shoot from behind someone or past someone selectively and some have even done it. I think role, number of people, LE vs MIL, situation alone changes the rules you'll be using. Therefore I'd say that the rule may be broken, after all to win you have to selectively know when to break rules because rules aren't a law of warfare, they won't expand all situations.

You can say this for example with a question. Does a soldier need a map and compass as apart of his or her ESSENTIAL kit? Well that depends on role. Are you an unsupported fireteam in the middle of Afghanistan who may go into SERE mode? Of course you do. Are you in a huge Platoon where your Section Leader and 2IC has a map? Then probably not! From kit you can ask the same question for capabilities. Simply put laws don't mean jackshit to nature.


1:51. Rather be alive with my buddy than worried about a round, that judging by my ballistic knowledge will not hit him. IMMEDIATE THREAT vs "Safety" when my muzzle and arc of fire isn't anywhere near (measured from meters to inches) of my partners head, who is a trained partner who will react the way you would expect, i.e. crouch, prone rather than jump and flinch (body alarm response) into your LOF. Safety may be taking out a threat.


1:40 onwards, shooting past his buddy to engage the threat as the buddy rushes the room.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 9:13 am
by jimothy_183
Well I think it just goes back to Gabe Suarez's quote "risk is the currency of CQB".

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 7:42 pm
by tacticalguy
Ryan wrote:Good statement but officers vs infantry. Totally different roles, theaters. Conventional vs unconventional, totally different - Section tactics to Platoon. For a conventional guy I can see and understand those rules and fears but for the unconventional guys I've talked to they agree with shoot from behind someone or past someone selectively and some have even done it. I think role, number of people, LE vs MIL, situation alone changes the rules you'll be using. Therefore I'd say that the rule may be broken, after all to win you have to selectively know when to break rules because rules aren't a law of warfare, they won't expand all situations.
On target, sir!
This statement is also true, however.
One of the core safety rules that I teach in any tactical course is that the lead shooter has the priority of shot. This means you do not shoot past other officers. You either get on line or move ahead of them to make a shot. Four out of five times you will get away with shooting past your partners, but the fifth time you will shoot one of your own. In the past two years, there have been at least two instances in which officers were struck by friendly fire during shootouts with bad guys. In both cases, officers in the rear of the formation shot officers in front of them.
With one caveat: Training, training, training. Teams that practice 25-30 hrs per week are MUCH less likely to commit that error. Teams that only train together for 15 hrs or less a week, I'd be concerned about the risk.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 3:56 am
by Ryan
Here's a strange one. In contact: MAKE AS MUCH NOISE AS YOU CAN.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Fri Oct 05, 2012 4:27 am
by tacticalguy
More noise= more team mates. They're going to want to break contact as soon as possible. You're practicing psyops, at that point. Surprise, speed and violence of action. That cacophonous noise falls under surprise AND violence of action.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 2:26 pm
by Ryan
One that I try to conduct is to always split the area, be it an opening or alleyway. I use this principle if you're closed off on a narrow angle then whoever holds that angle has the right to just pick off, suppress, move upon or use an aid against their opponent because they are in the dominating position. To open up solutions you can split the area or virtually maneuver around it.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sun Dec 02, 2012 4:20 pm
by tacticalguy
Ryan wrote:One that I try to conduct is to always split the area, be it an opening or alleyway. I use this principle if you're closed off on a narrow angle then whoever holds that angle has the right to just pick off, suppress, move upon or use an aid against their opponent because they are in the dominating position. To open up solutions you can split the area or virtually maneuver around it.
Good rule based on a solid geometrical fact. Angles in alleys and tight spaces are not your friends if you're trying to move quickly.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Mon Jan 14, 2013 1:14 am
by Ryan
"Always ride the door all the way to the wall to ensure behind it is clear."

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:53 pm
by Ryan
Improvise. Adapt. Overcome.

Good golden rule or too general?

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Mon Feb 04, 2013 12:33 pm
by tacticalguy
Ryan wrote:Improvise. Adapt. Overcome.

Good golden rule or too general?
The U.S.M.C. motto? A lot of merit in that statement. Yes, it's general but, it also states two of the leading hallmarks of good tactical theory, improvisation and adaptability, as well improving esprit de corp with it's promise of success. I kind of see it this way, "improvise+adapt=overcome".

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 3:36 am
by Ryan
Yes. I like mottos, they relate to rules to live by AND fight by. For example: Opportunity, ability, intent. They keys to be able to succeed before the event even occurs. I like general quotes in that sense, it relates to your daily habits and training-come-experience as well as the combat picture.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Mon Feb 18, 2013 7:37 am
by jimothy_183
Yeah I Like to call them martial proverbs. :P '

A famous series of those, what I'm sure you've heard of, would be Murphy's Laws of Combat.

Re: The Golden Rules of CQB

Posted: Tue Feb 19, 2013 4:42 am
by tacticalguy
jimothy_183 wrote:Yeah I Like to call them martial proverbs. :P '

A famous series of those, what I'm sure you've heard of, would be Murphy's Laws of Combat.
Yup, learned all about 'em when I first went into the U.S. Army in the '80s.