Room Clearing Communications

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Alan
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Room Clearing Communications

Post by Alan » Sat Sep 06, 2008 10:56 pm

I am simply wondering what the general consensus on this forum is regarding comms for room clearing, my team mates and I have been trying various ideas to find the ideal balance between speed, safety and good verbal communications.

The problem is finding the balance between giving the team leader enough information to make a good decision and not giving irrelevant information that will slow down the mission.

Lets take an example (room clearing)

Imagine the element is wanting to enter and clear a room on the left, I would currently expect the following comms:


#1: 'Open Door Left'
Team Leader: 'Stack Door Left'
#6: 'Good To Go'
Team Leader: 'Enter & Clear'
#1: 'Clear'
#2: 'Clear'
#3: 'Clear'
#4: 'Clear'
#5: 'Hallway Clear'
#6: 'Hallway Clear'

The advantage of this is that there is very little chatter, but the problem as I see it is that it doesn't really help the Team leader decide what is the next best move for the team as he doesn't have much information to form a picture of the situation.

#1: 'One - Open Door 1000'
Team Leader: 'Stack Door 1000'
#6: 'Six - Good To Go'
Team Leader: 'Enter & Clear'
#1: 'One - Clear'
#2: 'Two - Clear'
#3: 'Three - Closed Door 120O'
#4: 'Four - Closed Door 1200'
#5: 'Five - Closed Hallway 0900'
#6: 'Six - Closed Hallway 0300'

These extra details will help the Team Leader form a mental picture of the situation and can therefore make a better decision for the team.

Opinions ?

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jimothy_183
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Post by jimothy_183 » Sun Sep 07, 2008 12:29 am

Personally I like the one where you call out the general direction of the doors or windows as I think it gives a good balance between simplicity and good verbal comms.

I think having to call out the direction of the doors is too complex for both the team member and the team leader as you have to think about where everything is. The more doors there are the more stuff you have to call out, for example: What if you've got multiple doorways down a long hallway?

I think that calling out the general directions would be faster and still give enough information to the team leader. For example, a team member can call out 3 doors on the right. Yeah sure, the team leader might not get a perfect picture of the room in his mind but I still think it would be a good enough picture.

Also, to support the general directions thing, I think that the team leader should have to scan the room himself after the team has entered the room and cleared it.

However I also think that both these techniques could work well but you just need to practice them.
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Admin
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Post by Admin » Sun Sep 07, 2008 6:40 am

My experience is limited to missions where the layout was known and tactics had bin trained many times on a model made on the floor, this meant that all know where all the doors was and the route for every team was known in advance. So the only commands used were:

“Take control”
“I have control”
“Securing”
“Room clear”
“Stack-up”
This was all that was needed.

Another way I have trained is if you don’t know the layout of the room, you enter in a Sop standard 4 man wall flood and when the shooting stops the operator in the left corner starts reporting from his sector if he has anything to tell, in not he just say “1-clear”.
Then the second man from the left sound of and so on, this way the team leader gets a visual picture of the room from left corner to right. This is a slow way and in my mind not optimal but the best I know of.

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Post by jcheng14 » Tue Sep 23, 2008 5:52 am

Sorry for being gone so long, but i got busy with work and school and such.

When clearing a room, one should know your AOR, as well as all your teammates AOR's, thus when a person calls door or hall or window, you should already have a general ideal of the layout.

Additionally, numbers are not needed when reporting in, as it should be done in sequence anyways. The only time when reporting wont be done in sequence is when you have a man down, in which case you have bigger problems then trying to decide how to move to the next room.

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Post by Jack » Wed Oct 01, 2008 2:37 am

The key here is training. Do you work on a Team that trains all the time, or are you working with a Team that is made up of different people every time you do an entry?

If you do not work together very often, then communication should be minimal and the Team Leader should put extreme restrictions on what Operators can do without his permission.

If a Team works together all the time and has time to practice then common terms should be developed, but even that should be kept to a minimum and "plain talk" should be encouraged.

I think that communication is extremely important and that it should be encouraged. But I think that Teams should, generally, avoid developing their own language and that they should stick to "plain talk". Although I admit that a small number of common terms is very helpful.

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jimothy_183
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Post by jimothy_183 » Wed Oct 01, 2008 3:05 am

I agree with Jake.

The thing is, I don't really know if my team is one that trains together all the time or if it is with different people all the time. I kinda think it's in between the two categories here as we have a small team of 6 and there are usually about 4 or 5 of us on at every training session.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

KJ
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Re: Room Clearing Communications

Post by KJ » Thu Oct 02, 2008 5:59 pm

Alan wrote:I am simply wondering what the general consensus on this forum is regarding comms for room clearing, my team mates and I have been trying various ideas to find the ideal balance between speed, safety and good verbal communications.

The problem is finding the balance between giving the team leader enough information to make a good decision and not giving irrelevant information that will slow down the mission.

Lets take an example (room clearing)

Imagine the element is wanting to enter and clear a room on the left, I would currently expect the following comms:


#1: 'Open Door Left'
Team Leader: 'Stack Door Left'
#6: 'Good To Go'
Team Leader: 'Enter & Clear'
#1: 'Clear'
#2: 'Clear'
#3: 'Clear'
#4: 'Clear'
#5: 'Hallway Clear'
#6: 'Hallway Clear'

The advantage of this is that there is very little chatter, but the problem as I see it is that it doesn't really help the Team leader decide what is the next best move for the team as he doesn't have much information to form a picture of the situation.

#1: 'One - Open Door 1000'
Team Leader: 'Stack Door 1000'
#6: 'Six - Good To Go'
Team Leader: 'Enter & Clear'
#1: 'One - Clear'
#2: 'Two - Clear'
#3: 'Three - Closed Door 120O'
#4: 'Four - Closed Door 1200'
#5: 'Five - Closed Hallway 0900'
#6: 'Six - Closed Hallway 0300'

These extra details will help the Team Leader form a mental picture of the situation and can therefore make a better decision for the team.

Opinions ?
i like your techniuqe but i also agree with jake that comunication is a huge part of what a team needs to do you can be just 2 guys and take out 10 if your comunication is really good
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Ryan
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Re: Room Clearing Communications

Post by Ryan » Wed Apr 27, 2011 6:59 am

With big teams or multiple teams it's always good to shout 'coming out'. And with 'last room' or 'last room clear' once you've cleared all rooms.

Everyone should know what the hell you are on about too. :lol:

One I wrote from the clan a while ago on comms:
"I noticed that some of us are not working well as a team, due to communication and lack of understanding (some even call it common sense).

We can address this problem in weekly meetings or by talking to someone who is apart of AAF leadership. If you feel someone is causing issues then by all means contact a leader.

For those who do not know how to work co-operatively and communicate effectively then read below.

Teamwork:
Working well together is an important part of clan-life. Most organisations work around teams not individuals, they bring together common knowledge and skills required for a set task.

Teams are special forms of groups; a well-organised collection of individuals who depend on eachother and share responsibilities for specific goals.

A team can be defined as:
An established structure
Reliance of individuals on eachother
Have a sense of identity
The individuals having roles to fulfill
Having clearly identified goals and tasks
Having rules for expected behaviour
Having rules for within and outside the team (how you talk to people within the team and outside, also how you communicate with other clans i.e. no aggression or being offensive)

For the team to be effective there needs to be an overall focus on the tasks, relationships and attitudes of all team members. There has to be direction to a topic.

Advantages:
Quicker response times
Inspiration
Take advantage of unique skills of each individual
Support and encouragement
Lighter work load
More ideas and points
Increased motivation

Strategies:
Dignity and the rights of the individual
Slef-determination
Empathy
Empowerment
Professionlism
To be clan centred (if possible)

You should:
Always act professionally and in the interest of the clan
Listen to team memebers (feedback)
Focus on the issue
Be aware of decisions made by management
Break down a large number of problems into small tasks (responsibility)
Develop practical solutions
Be flexible and work in partnership with others
Be aware of diversity and individual differences
Work collaboratively

Management should:
Listen to everyones point of view
Listen to the majority
Be pro-active
Assess, planning and evaluating

Communication:
Communication is the activity of conveying information. Communication requires a sender, a message, and an intended recipient, although the receiver need not be present or aware of the sender's intent to communicate at the time of communication; thus communication can occur across vast distances in time and space. Communication requires that the communicating parties share an area of communicative commonality. The communication process is complete once the receiver has understood the sender.

Advantages:
No confusion
Easier to understand
Easier to get along with and fit in
Quicker response times

The communicative process:

referent (motivates one person to communicate with another)

sender/receiver (encoding and decoding message)

message: what is being communicated

channels: how the message is disseminated

feedback: how the person giving the message picks up that the message has been received

interpersonal variables: reasons why someone can or can’t give or receive the message

environment: surroundings that may affect the delivery or reception of the message.

The Elements of Effective Communication:
Empathy
Active Listening
Clarifying
Responding
Confronting
Interpersonal Style
Cultural, Religious Influence
Language
Environment
Genuineness
Attitude
Non Verbal
Appropriate Verbal Activity

Strategies:
Relevance (be relevant to the current topic)
Relationship (if someone does not like you then word your sentences carefully, you do not want to aggrivate the situation)
Reinforcement (reinforce a topic you agree with)
Assertiveness
Understanding

Here is a good read on communication: http://www.mindpub.com/art196.htm"
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

Dramaticus
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Location: Norway

Re: Room Clearing Communications

Post by Dramaticus » Wed Jan 02, 2013 7:06 pm

Great writing on communication, Ryan! Simple and well written :)
Alan wrote:Lets take an example (room clearing)

Imagine the element is wanting to enter and clear a room on the left, I would currently expect the following comms:


#1: 'Open Door Left'
Team Leader: 'Stack Door Left'
#6: 'Good To Go'
Team Leader: 'Enter & Clear'
#1: 'Clear'
#2: 'Clear'
#3: 'Clear'
#4: 'Clear'
#5: 'Hallway Clear'
#6: 'Hallway Clear'
My understanding of communication in a room clearing (4 man team):

#1: "Open Door Left!"
#2(TL): "Open Door Left, Stack Left!"

- After The Room Have Been Dominated -

#2(TL): "Status!"
#1: "One Clear!"
#2: "Two Clear!"
#3: "Three, Open Door Front!"
#4: "Four Clear!"
#2(TL): "Room Clear! Dry Hole! Open Door Front, Stack Right!"


Clearing a room consisting of a barricade (4 man team):

#1: "Open Door Left!"
#2(TL): "Open Door Left, Stack Left!"

- After The Room Have Been Dominated -

#2(TL): "Status!"
#1: "One Clear!"
#2: "Two Clear!"
#3: "Three, Barricade Left Side!"
#4: "Four Clear!"
#2(TL): "Left Side, Check That Barricade!" ("Left Side", meaning that the two operators on the LEFT side of the doorway acts as a "buddy team")
#3: "Cover Me!"
#1: "Covering!"
*Searches & Clears The Barricade*
#3: "Barricade Clear!"
#2(TL): "Room Clear! Dry Hole! Four Friendlies Coming out!"


This is just a short example from my part. If my understanding of verbal communication is wrong, please let me know ;)

EDIT: My examples is just one of MANY variations on how to communicate during room clearings!
Last edited by Dramaticus on Sun Jan 06, 2013 6:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Formerly known as, Dramatikk.

ClearRight
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2012 8:39 pm

Re: Room Clearing Communications

Post by ClearRight » Sat Jan 05, 2013 2:18 pm

Obviously, comms depends on the situation (dynamic or subdued entry - have we gone noisy yet?) and the skill of the team. For a well-trained team, there is less need to involve the team leader (TL). For a less well-trained team, the TL should be more involved in making the decisions. For example:

(stacking on a closed door with a 4-man team + TL, and other teams providing security in the hallway - 2-man entry)
#3: "3 ready"
#2: "2 ready"
#1: "1 ready"
Breacher/door-man: "3-2-1-GO" (opens door)
entry is made, technique: modified - #1 goes where he can't see upon entry, #2 goes the opposite direction, #3 is ready on the door to support if needed, breacher ready to become #4 if needed
Search hard corner, chest level, ceiling, floor - there's an open door on the left-hand wall
#2: "2 clear, covering open door left"
#1: "1 clear - TL peek in"
TL: "peeking in"
(TL takes a peek through the door, gains proper situational awareness and makes his decision)
TL: "3 and breacher: enter left and stack on open door left, 1: stack as #3 on them"
#3: "2 men coming in left"
#1: "Come in"
#3: "Coming in"
#3 and breacher enter and stack on door (the become #1 and #2, respectively), #1 stacks up as #3.

This is an example of pretty rigid SOPs and comms, which I find to be useful for less well-trained teams. Not as dynamic and depends on the TL to make decisions. With practice, the TL can be taken more out of the equation, decisions pushed down to operator level and comms shortened.
More guns and bullets make bad guys go away faster,
which in turn makes everyone in the area safer.
- Paul Howe

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