Comment on Entry Technique: Run/Running the Rabbit

Forum to discuss CQB entry tactics / room clearing, with other registered users.

Moderators: jimothy_183, Admin

Post Reply
User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Comment on Entry Technique: Run/Running the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Thu Oct 27, 2011 11:02 am

Running the Rabbit (Bait and Reel as pictured)
Offensive technique without the need for surprise (though it does help!). Distract and engage.

Image
If #2 or #1 man is covering then that is a bounding motion to the RTR. Internal bounding can increase survival rates.

"Let's start with the type of opponent. He is aware, and he is expecting you to come through that room, he has trained his weapon onto the fatal funnel (this is known as a Door Ambush). If you can't engage him from outside or use any kind of multiplier to destroy him and you and your team must go in there then this is a risky but very offensive and dynamic tactic for a high-risk entry.

For this to work you need to mixture of temporary surprise and aggression in the face of danger with speed and efficient teamwork.

The first man into the room is the Rabbit (also nicely known as the sacrifice man!), he jolts into the room full-sprint and thereby distracts the main enemy firing arc towards the centre of the room onto him. He keeps moving in a 11, 12 or 1 o'clock arc (depending on obstacles) and once half to three quarters of the way into the room, begins to sweep into it, with his head and weapon on a swivel, until he finds the target and engages.

As he moves in, the numbers two and three move in, normally by buttonhook fashion, and begin clear each hard corner then sweep into the room; I might add in a see-and-shoot fashion, if you have an enemy in your arc then engage, do not clear the hard corner to only come back to a live target to engage - this is unrealistic training.

As the first man in stays near the centre or 11, 12 or 1 o'clock axis of the room then he shall not be in any friendlies line of fire. (In Theory, as always)

Good things to know.... if your buddy, the pointman/rabbit, takes fire from the left or right side then the second man instantly clears that hard and easy corner. It gives you real-time information, though with short notice, to where your enemy is and how many. It also allows the rabbit to sweep that sector of the room first before any other, once the standard penetration length has been achieved.

Image
As demonstrated: Centre-fed B&R.

Image
Splat!

Distract, make time, and work as a team to take out the target.

This is a high risk technique and will probably either develop a WIA or KIA. Work on it as a team, and practice or modify it to make it fit your scenarios. We make the Rabbit go prone, fake an entry and all kinds of things.

It is still classified a tactic because it has a higher success rate than conventional entries within an offensive environment (as opposed to a stealthily one) and creates enough time and space for victory. No tactic is perfect." - Copied from a post I made. What you guys think? What are some other good OFFENSIVE techniques without the use surprise?

CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

badger
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:54 pm
Location: Slovakia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by badger » Thu Oct 27, 2011 4:47 pm

You can use this technique only in game, no in real world.
There are lot of more safe methods to engage the suspect inside, also in cases you lost surprise.
Mirrors, dogs, gas, explosives, shields, etc....

Something similar teach Gabe Suarez, going around the corners or entering the room when you are alone. But its method only in very emergency situations.

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Thu Oct 27, 2011 8:36 pm

What other safe methods? This is used in reality. It is taught at SFAUCS, otherwise ACQB - advanced CQB - and can be used in a number of ways, i.e. a short RTR whilst conducting ANOTHER tactic. You run the rabbit if you cross a danger area, with or without cover you're still a rabbit. The case here is the rabbit can shoot as he moves. The team may not have distraction devices or such mentioned things.

You mention games? The US military came up with it and use it. Whether it's Delta Force in a promotional video or CAG doing some high-risk compromised entry. Basing such techniques of reality is a matter of life and death, I agree. And that's what it is based on. But then again you base "games" off your shooting too - paper targets, pistol competitions. It's not made for failure by design but some amount of techniques, i.e. buttonhook, aren't creating COMPETITION for the opponent but shooting fish in a barrel situations, others create more competition.

If you look at uncontrolled zones in the military, it's different to controlling around your target house. It's dynamic, it's uncontrollable at the best of times and it's unpredictable. Plus if you look equipment wise at other armies - say the ANA, well they aren't equipped to operate like that and therefore other suggestions come into play. The power of suggestion here is: You can shy away from dogma.

I note that IACT Tactical, i.e. High Threat Systems LLC, employ such a technique in their high threat drill - which has been taught to USSF, SWAT, etc. Sometimes you have more of a chance with a "losing" technique or one with more risk. CQB is measured in risk. Sometimes it's measured in getting in the room and drawing attention or drawing fire away from a point. It's like flanking or baiting, actual techniques with risk but this is different because it's in a small-scale level.

What if you don't have dogs, shields?! You improvise, which is risky. I would class below as an emergency/crisis situation, and off that a decision made and the guys just going with it. Most do not have flashbangs out on the field, never mind shields. You also note that initial situations, i.e. first time in an area, may lead to being unprepared equipment, tactic and whatever else wise - therefore doctrine and thought patterns are adjusted over the course of engagements, the course of battles and of the entire war effort.

"For those that may have missed October's issue of the SWJ Magazine...

Bing West was kind enough to permit us to post a chapter from No True Glory.

Here it is: The House From Hell...



On the morning of 13 November, Kilo Company set out to clear the dense blocks of houses stretching from Phase Line Henry west to the Euphrates. Captain Jent told 1/Lt Grapes that his platoon would take the lead and Grapes assigned a block to each squad. After the previous day's fight, the platoon was tired but excited, expecting immediate action, but the insurgents had retreated to the south and no contact was made in the first block.

The 3rd Squad began searching the second block by shooting and hammering at an unyielding lock on a courtyard gate. Admitting defeat, Corporal Ryan Weemer sat down to smoke a cigarette.

Screw this one, he thought, 2nd Squad has some C-4. They can clear it later.

Sergeant Christopher Pruitt, the Platoon Guide, ran across the street to pry open a side gate of the next house. Tough and muscular, Pruitt had a challenging nature and never relaxed.

”Hey, this gate's open," he yelled. "Let’s go!”

Weemer threw down his smoke and hustled over with Sergeant James Eldrige and Lance Corporals Cory Carlisle and James Prentice.

The five Marines slipped into the courtyard and Pruitt looked inside the outhouse. Fresh ####.

“They’re inside!" Pruitt whispered.

The cement house, with a dome-shaped roof and a small upper story, looked too small to hold more than a few enemy. So rather wait for a tank, the Marines decided to assault. Weemer, who had gone through the Close Quarters Battle (CQB) special training, posted Prentice as rear security and gestured to Carlisle and Pruitt to stack behind him. He slung his M16 and took out his pistol. Drawing a deep breath, he kicked down the door and charged across the room. He was “running the rabbit", a technique where the point man rushes across the room to distract the enemy while the second man in the stack does the shooting.

As Weemer sprinted across the entryway room, he glimpsed an insurgent with an AK hiding next to the door. As he ran by, Weemer fired three rounds into the man. Carlisle burst in after Weemer, almost bumped into the gunman and jumped back, spilling into Pruitt.

“Go!” Pruitt yelled, shoving him back into the room.

Carlisle stepped forward and fired a long burst into the insurgent, who sagged to the floor. Carlisle then fired another burst into the dead man.

“Stop shooting and get over here,” Weemer yelled.

Carlisle ran across the room and flattened himself against the wall next to Weemer.

"Ready to clear?" Weemer said, gesturing at the open doorway to his left that led to the main room.

With Carlisle on his hip, Weemer charged in and was blinded by the pulsing white flashes of an AK muzzle exploding in his face. Weemer thrust out his right arm and fired eight bullets into the insurgent. The two were standing five feet apart, looking into each other's eyes, firing furiously. Weemer could feel bullets whizzing by his face. Chips of brick and concrete were pelting him on the cheeks, his ears ringing.

Weemer was a qualified expert shot with a pistol. There was no way he had missed with a dozen bullets. He was close enough to slap the man. The man would not go down.

Weemer was running out of bullets. He shuffled towards the door, still firing, and pushed Carlisle back into the first room.

The AK rounds that missed Weemer as he made entry had passed through the door and struck Pruitt and Eldridge. Bones were shattered in the wrist of Pruitt’s firing hand and Eldridge was hit in the shoulder and chest. They staggered out of the house and Pruitt tripped and fell near the front gate. As he struggled to get up, an insurgent on the roof opened fire, the bullets kicking dirt into his face. He dove around the wall and joined Eldridge on the street.

Inside the house, Prentice, who had slid inside the doorway, saw a man wearing a green camouflage jacket and black pants rush out from a back room. Prentice fired a long burst from his SAW, hitting the man in the chest and head, killing him instantly.

Weemer turned back to Carlisle.

"Reload and we'll finish that other ####er."

Keeping his eyes on the doorway, Weemer patted his pistol leg-holster.

Where's my extra mag? he thought. ####.

He dropped his pistol and unhooked the M-16 from his back. He heard someone stumbling towards them and backed up as the insurgent hobbled out from the main room. Weemer shot him in the legs and, when he fell, shot him twice in the face. The man, wearing black body armor over a blue denim shirt, was light-skinned, with a red bandana tied around his curly hair.

Hearing the firing and seeing the wounded, other Marines were rushing to the house. Lance Corporal Samuel Severtsgard burst into the entry room. As he had done in yesterday's fight, Severtsgard was holding a grenade.

He nodded at Severtsgard, who pitched the grenade into the main room. Immediately after the explosion, Weemer and Carlisle rushed in. The air was filled with black smoke and the acrid smell of gunpowder. Weemer broke right and waited a moment for the dust to settle. He saw a stairwell against the left wall and quickly raised his M-16. Above him was a dome-shaped skylight and a circular catwalk with a solid, three-foot high cement guard railing. The stairs led to the catwalk.

As Weemer brought his rifle up, he saw an insurgent leaning over the cement railing, sighting in. The M-16 and the AK began firing at the same time, the sound deafening. Weemer felt his leg buckle. A hard blow rocked back his face..." - http://council.smallwarsjournal.com/sho ... php?t=1010.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

badger
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:54 pm
Location: Slovakia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by badger » Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:01 pm

At work I always have shields,mirorrs,tear gas and masks,flasbangs and other distraction devices not always dogs.
You can negotiate.

Yes,they can teach this technique,but as posibility,not the main way. As you wrote,the rabbit has high probabality of hit. Why use this dangerous and KIA or WIA technique,if I can choose another more safe.

I see the sence in game and in shity situations,described by Gabe.

Or....
As a preventive way,going around the corners or entering big halls. When we trained this technique it works fine when the space is clear without any obstacles. If there is some structure inside it's tactical advantage for tangos.

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Fri Oct 28, 2011 12:15 pm

Ah yes I see. I get you now. :) Thanks for the feedback. But never "quit" until you "try" ... :wink: I believe half of the techniques are tactical advantages for the bad guys - because they're there to get somebody to do something crazy in a short-time period. Structured training blocks are rigid on what they teach. And after all you're very close with no room for error, even the best operator with the best tactic can be hurt. Sometimes it's "too close" - and coming through funneled terrain is like a mini-ambush, a door ambush.

If you SPLIT your operators you create a dilemma for the enemy.
If you TRIANGULATE FIRE you can increase chances of survival and decrease time for the threat to be completely mitigated.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
jimothy_183
Military
Posts: 1030
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Australia

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by jimothy_183 » Mon Nov 07, 2011 1:37 pm

badger wrote:At work I always have shields,mirorrs,tear gas and masks,flasbangs and other distraction devices not always dogs.
You can negotiate.

Yes,they can teach this technique,but as posibility,not the main way. As you wrote,the rabbit has high probabality of hit. Why use this dangerous and KIA or WIA technique,if I can choose another more safe.

I see the sence in game and in shity situations,described by Gabe.

Or....
As a preventive way,going around the corners or entering big halls. When we trained this technique it works fine when the space is clear without any obstacles. If there is some structure inside it's tactical advantage for tangos.
I agree with badger.

It's too reckless for my tastes but it would be nice to have something like this in the ol' bag of tricks for when the SHTF and as I said before options are good.

As someone I talked to once said about this "it uses speed aggression and surprise. its bold, unconventional".

If used in the right situation it could potentially break the enemy's OODA loop, thus giving the good guys the tactical advantage.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

Dramatikk

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Dramatikk » Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:33 pm

Would not the use of a DD(distraction device) pretty much do the same job as the "rabbit"? So why the need for a "rabbit" to unnecessarily risk his/her life to break the bad guys OODA, when a 6-bang grenade for example can do the same job, and this without risking one of the operators life ...

Kind regards, Dramatikk. :)

User avatar
jimothy_183
Military
Posts: 1030
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Australia

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by jimothy_183 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 7:47 am

Because you may one day find yourself in a situation where you won't have a DD but still have to make a dynamic entry.

As I said, this would only be used as a last resort of sorts. There are other things you could probably use that would work better in the absence of a DD.

Variations in tactics is an important thing. An entire chapter in "The Art of War" has been written on it.

Therefore it would be wise to have something like this up your sleeve so to speak.

You always want to give yourself options.



Here is a quick example:

Say you're operating in an area where the bad guys have fought with you for long enough to know your usual tactics.

Now say you are in a situation where you need to make a dynamic entry but have no DDs .

Perhaps now would be the time to consider the use of a tactic that is vastly different from your usual approach and put the BGs hiding inside into confusion -> broken OODA
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:56 am

The uncounterable DD huh Dramatikk. :P A DD is not a human, it's something people expect now. It's not a bait. This is about creating a dilemma and stopping the enemy from just simply blasting the entry point by splitting operators and getting in the room.

P.S. Some people called the SAS reckless in WW2 and asked for them to be disbanded - doesn't mean everything is reckless. It doesn't mean it's "too risky", sometimes it's perfect for risk. Sometimes self-sacrifice goes longer than another tactic, the situation can be dire.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
jimothy_183
Military
Posts: 1030
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Australia

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by jimothy_183 » Tue Nov 08, 2011 1:14 pm

Well I wouldn't call it uncounterable, after all nothing is uncounterable no matter how good it is.

This is simply a tactic that has an extremely high risk but if used successfully will give an extremely high reward.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

badger
Posts: 100
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 8:54 pm
Location: Slovakia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by badger » Tue Nov 08, 2011 9:10 pm

Sometimes you cant use DD, for example drug laboratory in progress, little kids, etc, etc.

ari-free
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Dec 14, 2011 4:52 pm

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by ari-free » Wed Dec 14, 2011 5:16 pm

Running the rabbit is mentioned as a technique for handling an L shaped room. Many rooms are L shaped.
http://www.specialoperations.com/mout/moutpoi22a.html

" The verbal technique begins after the initial entry is made and the L-shape is discovered. The Marine closest to the L-shape will cover as much area into the second enclosure as possible by “cutting the pie” (he must be careful not to expose himself too far into the second enclosure). The second Marine will move up the wall with his weapon fixed on the L-shape. He needs to be extremely muzzle conscious to avoid accidentally firing on the first Marine). The first Marine will then tell the second Marine “I am the rabbit”. Upon receiving the reply “I’m with you – go” from the second Marine, the first Marine will move quickly across the L-shape into the next enclosure while clearing his sector of fire. His movement should not be a sprint, but an “accelerated combat glide”. The rabbit must maintain his ability to engage threats on the move. Timing is critical in this technique because when the first Marine (rabbit) is approximately two steps into the open area, the second Marine will buttonhook and barricade shoot around the wall clearing his sector of fire as he moves. The standard rules apply for the rabbit’s new point of domination as he stays at least two steps off the wall."

This powerpoint (apologize for crazy url) gives a diagram if you scroll down to the slide 'running the rabbit'
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q= ... zZ3nO7W7-A

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Fri Dec 16, 2011 3:20 am

jimothy_183 wrote:Well I wouldn't call it uncounterable, after all nothing is uncounterable no matter how good it is.
Haha that was my best try at written sarcasm...

But on a serious note, no one has thought of a way to counter a DD? :P
You'd think they'd expect it to come in the room by now.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Thu Dec 29, 2011 3:42 am

"Running the Rabbit- All it does is leave one man totally out to hang, potentially facing multiple openings and a hallway. If there is a BG in any room or down the hall, all he has to do is wait for a person to come into the open and shoot. The "rabbit" needs to check all of the angles, find the threat, then engage the threat who will most likely be partially obscured. Why not do a high low? At least you can retreat if there is a belt-fed down the hall. Unnecessarily Totally exposed, no tactical advantage."

I disagree with the above if a limited entry occurs and you isolate the threat location or an external structure analysis tells you that it will be a normal room. Either way, run the long wall if possible, corner feds work better than center feds.

You could no doubt mix it up. All in the toolbox. Even mix high/low w/ RTR-3 Guys doing it. It's taught in SFAUC (Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat) -- as is a lot of different techniques. It's just another one for the toolbox, not saying it will fit your goals (especially LE vs Mil vs your goal). All pro's and con's are welcome. And to the quote above, "all angles" can be simply looking left and right as you enter and orientating to a threat, like a lateral entry.

I know what I'm suggesting is completely screwed up but the situation that calls for it is completely screwed up...
An irrational situation does not always call for rational actions.

For those don't get it fine, you intentionally don't want to think about it because it's a tough decision. Well, welcome to the world. Reality trumps out-of-touch opinion with the capabilities of any unique firefight. Understand it isn't all black and white, there is grey too! Sometimes "untactical" trumps tactical.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
jimothy_183
Military
Posts: 1030
Joined: Thu Feb 21, 2008 7:55 am
Location: Australia

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by jimothy_183 » Thu Dec 29, 2011 4:36 am

Ryan wrote: You could no doubt mix it up. All in the toolbox. Even mix high/low w/ RTR-3 Guys doing it. It's taught in SFAUC (Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat) -- as is a lot of different techniques. It's just another one for the toolbox, not saying it will fit your goals (especially LE vs Mil vs your goal). All pro's and con's are welcome.
That's my point exactly. Being unpredictable is a long established and legitimate strategy.

Watch the whole vid if you want but the relevant part is @ 2:15


Kariya Kagetoki wrote: [you] Show movements that completely contradict expectations. But in martial arts you should use your head more. If you only use your instinct and reflexes, you are limited.
semper acer , semper velox , semper trux , semper promptus

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Thu Dec 29, 2011 5:07 am

That's some Men Who Stares at Goats phasing right there. :lol: Oh, Samurai.




Some other good ones. One of the best warrior classes that ever lived on this planet.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Wed Nov 21, 2012 9:34 am

If I break this drill down. You see what looks like, what I call a "lateral entry", basically the rabbit phase of RTR without a buddy team. It's basically the bounding phase of the HTLE. I don't know the official verbage but it's not exactly running the rabbit as it doesn't have a team or another person to back you up. It can also turn into a room penetration (2-4 man penetration).


0:27 seen here (Or are they simply running the wall as the building leads to the left?).

If you think of lateral movement, to the full left or right and put that into an entry drill; it could work in some specific scenarios on its own. Especially for an individual who breaks across the open. If you have already isolated the threat to a hard corner it may be an applicable technique, though, because you are exposed you are in obvious risk; such as if you jam, miss or get hit. Again, run the rabbit is risky - and this is the rabbit phase of such a drill, of course it's risky. But is it applicable?

Would an individual benefit running the rabbit and entering laterally?

Image
Note: The operator would engage the threat in the hard corner as he/she went.
Image
Note! As above when you move laterally you are engaging too. You do not MOVE to the position to engage, you engage as you move and once in position you check target and then check the rest of the room.

The range lateral drill as below.

Image
Above: Engaging on the move.

So, think about that versus the traditional entry below.
Image
Image
In the traditional method you are stuck in that fatal funnel, facing the threat. Sure, great for your frontal plates to get some work and those bypassing behind you but drawing the fire and attention away from the entry point could be a good thing. As could engaging on the move during the lateral version. Note also with the traditional that you have multiple operators in the fatal funnel from any angle, the suspect could be anywhere and get poly-hits.

Both are risky. Is the lateral one applicable, as the traditional one is to this day?
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

User avatar
Ryan
Posts: 2811
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:10 am
Location: Australia
Contact:

Re: Comment on Entry Technique: Run the Rabbit

Post by Ryan » Wed Jan 30, 2013 6:54 am

On research, the "Lateral Bound Snap Entry" was created by the same guys who made HTLE - High Threat Systems LLC. Lateral being your movement axis, bound being done by a two man team using effective internal 'bounding-like' techniques, snap being quick and snapping instantly to the direct threat - effective especially on a corner-fed as shown below.

"The lateral entry is vastly superior to the direct to threat entry. Two guns can get in the fight; shots are drawn away from the breach point, etc... Guys have studied this and it decreased the chance of #1 being hit and keeps the #2 from catching the same rounds."

As videoed here: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=159965700818224 ...

"Rabbiting/One-Man Room Clearing
Rabbiting is a situation where the number one man starts off so fast that no one has the time to catchup conversely a one-man room clear is when the number two-man just plan drops the ball and sends the number one man off into danger areas alone. The reaction time of a bad guy in a room is very fast and it should be within that time that number two-man is able to get in and provide support. If number one man runs into a danger area and doesn’t give two-man a chance to catch up it can be very bad and conversely if number two-man sort of gets behind the power curve and allows number one man to go it alone there can be dire consequences.

“NEVER ENGAGE IN A FAIR FIGHT”
-ME

Number one man needs to recognize that the guys behind him have to react to his movement before they can go so moving at below normal combat speed can mitigate that break in contact. Number two-man has to be on the ball, he needs to have the situational awareness that number one man can’t get, number two-man needs to be ready to go and support his number one man."

- http://tacticalathleticperformance.com/ ... -mistakes/ ...

I disagree with AJ's description of running the rabbit or rabbiting. Essentially he says second man is too far behind, but there should not be a gap of dispersion issue for second man, he should be right behind first man engaging from inside the room or from the doorjamb. Again, this should not be a gap of dispersion issue. One man clearing is bad most of the time, I agree with that and rabbiting has cons in that potential.


1:00. Rabbiting essentially on a hallway.
CQB-TEAM Education and Motivation.

"Pragmatism over theory."
"Anyone with a weapon is just as deadly as the next person."
"Unopposed CQB is always a success, if you wanted you could moonwalk into the room holding a Pepsi."

Post Reply

Return to “CQB entry tactics / room clearing”